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The History of Edinburgh’s Greenspace (Pt. 2)

This is the second in a series of blog posts on Edinburgh’s greenspaces, by postgraduate student, Jamie McDermaid. Jamie is studying Environment, Culture, and Communication at the University of Glasgow – with a particular interest in urban nature. This blog looks at how an intense period of development affected further urban expansion in the 1900s,

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The History of Edinburgh’s Greenspace (Pt. 1)

This is the first in a series of blog posts on Edinburgh’s greenspaces, by postgraduate student, Jamie McDermaid. Jamie is studying Environment, Culture, and Communication at the University of Glasgow – with a particular interest in urban nature. This blog post looks at the history of Edinburgh’s urban development from the late 1700s to early

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Improving the Mound for nature

Exciting work is taking place to improve the Mound for nature. Cheryl Jones, Sustainability Manager, Future Workplace, Lloyds Banking Group explains how the company is improving the greenspace around its iconic head office in Edinburgh’s city centre for nature, and how this work fits in with the Edinburgh Nature Network.  How important has championing wildlife and

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Edinburgh’s new approach to greenspace management leads to butterfly havens

Edinburgh Living Landscape partners are helping butterflies cope with the impacts of climate change by changing the management of green spaces in the city. Speckled wood butterfly © Ashleigh WhiffinAs the climate warms, more species are able to move north into new areas that were previously too cold for them, but they still need the

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Edinburgh pledges to become a Million Tree City

Edinburgh Living Landscape is supporting the city’s ambitious target to become a Million Tree City by 2030. In October Lord Provost Frank Ross planted a tree in the grounds of Lauriston Castle alongside representatives of the Edinburgh Million Tree Forum who pledged their commitment to making sure Edinburgh will be home to one million trees

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Wildlife treasures uncovered in Edinburgh’s newest park

More than 200 different species of wildlife including locally rare butterflies have been found in Edinburgh’s newest park. Experts joined forces with local citizen scientists this summer to search for plants and animals at Little France Park in the east of the city during a special Wildlife Week. The species recorded in the park included

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New film explores Little France Park

Local residents Sarah Ford-Hutchinson and Barrie Williams have created a film exploring Little France Park in Edinburgh. This is the city’s newest park and, covering 45 hectares, it is the largest in a generation. Little France Park has reclaimed unmanaged grassland for the local community and carves out a green corridor from the city centre to

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Living Cities: creating flower rich urban meadows

In this guest blog, Leonie Alexander from the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh explains how to transform amenity grass into to vibrant flower rich meadows, and how this can benefit wildlife and was first published as part of the Scottish Wildlife Trust’s Living Cities series  Imagine the scene – the sound of birdsong, grasshoppers leaping out from under your feet,

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Little France Wildlife Week (17 – 21 June)

A week of activities is taking place in Little France Park from 17 – 21 June to celebrate its value for wildlife and collect new biological records.There are a number of events that local residents, workers and organisations can get involved in, as well as activities with local schools and specialist groups. Information gathered during the

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Reconnecting Edinburgh citizens with their coastline

Two new volunteer groups: Seafield Shoreline and Joppa Shoreline are being set up by local people, supported by the Edinburgh Shoreline project who were granted additional funding to continue until September 2019, saving the project from ending in April. After applying for more funding, they were successful in securing £15000 from Scottish National Heritage’s Green